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Man of Sentiment, A (1933)


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Pre Code Hollywood Season: FD Cinematheque

A Man of Sentiment (1933)

Man of Sentiment A 1

Director: Richard Thorpe

Cast: Marian Marsh, Owen Moore, Christian Rub, William Bakewell, Emma Dunn, Edmund Breese, Geneve Mitchell, Pat O’Malley, Syd Saylor

62 min

Plot

Herman Heupelkossel, a kindhearted orderly at a New York hospital, is teased by his fellow workers for the sympathy he gives patients. An unconscious, badly bleeding girl under twenty, the victim of a speeding, drunk driver, is brought in by the driver, twenty-four-year-old John Russell, who wants to be punished for his offense.

Herman sees that the girl, Julia Wilkins, will be alright in a few days and convinces John to hide his drunkenness so that he will be able to help Julia, rather than go to jail. With the aid of Limburger cheese, black coffee and Herman’s old pipe, John reluctantly covers up his alcoholic breath.

Man of Sentiment A 2

As Julia gets better, she and John fall in love, and when he brings her home to her roominghouse, he proposes. When the accident occurred, Julia had been on her way to meet her former suitor Stanley Colton, a wealthy playboy, and accept his offer to become his mistress in exchange for luxurious rooms, a piano, musical instruction and eventually a trip to Europe to study.

She now tells Colton, who is waiting at her room, that she only kidded herself into believing that she was a musical genius. Colton still extends an offer to help her, which John rebuffs. John, who has hidden from Julia the fact that he is the black sheep son of wealthy parents, takes her to his home, where his family, especially his snooty sister Doris, make the meeting unpleasant because they think she is after his money. As a result, Julia breaks off the engagement, which leads John to go on a drinking binge. When Herman learns of this, he calls Julia, who brings John to her room.

Man of Sentiment A 7

They plan to marry without financial help from his family, and this time, Julia, anxious to leave before anything else goes wrong, calls Colton to ask him for money. She goes to have dinner at his apartment, and after she refuses his entreaties that she break with John, he has her wait in his bedroom while he answers the door. John, whom Colton craftily had called and asked to visit after he heard from Julia, enters and accuses Julia of selling herself to Colton.

Their engagement broken again, Julia soon is kicked out of her room for non-payment of rent. After two weeks, she is taken to the hospital, suffering from pneumonia. Herman, thinking that John’s presence when she regains consciousness could determine whether she lives or dies, leaves the hospital to find him, at the risk of losing his job, but arrives at John’s house just after John has left to take a steamer to Europe.

Herman convinces John’s father of the urgency of the situation and they find John. As Mr. Russell is the hospital’s heaviest donor, Herman is not fired. Julia recovers and the couple are reconciled.

Man of Sentiment A 4

Cast

Marian Marsh Marian Marsh
Julia Wilkens
Owen Moore Owen Moore
Stanley Colton
Christian Rub Christian Rub
Herman Heupelkossel
William Bakewell William Bakewell
John Russell
Emma Dunn Emma Dunn
Mrs. John Russell Sr.
Edmund Breese Edmund Breese
John Russell Sr.
Geneva Mitchell Geneva Mitchell
Doris Russell
Pat O'Malley Pat O’Malley
Officer Ryan
Syd Saylor Syd Saylor
Swede – Orderly
Lucille Ward Lucille Ward
Miss Tracy
Cornelius Keefe Cornelius Keefe
Dr. Jordan
Otto Hoffman Otto Hoffman
Landlord
Matt McHugh Matt McHugh
Alex (Willie) Moran – Orderly
William Bailey William Bailey
Doctor
Mildred Washington Mildred Washington
Mildred – the Maid
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Lionel Backus Lionel Backus
Superintendent Orderly (uncredited)
John Beck John Beck
Beck – the Butler (uncredited)
Almeda Fowler Almeda Fowler
Nurse (uncredited)
Frank LaRue Frank LaRue
Sergeant Muldoon (uncredited)
Arthur Millett Arthur Millett
Bill Collector (uncredited)
Dick Rush Dick Rush
Barney – Ambulance Driver (uncredited)

 

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Blu Ray

Not released on Blu Ray

 

DVD

Not released on DVD

 

Red Man’s View, The (1909)


Mary Pickford 1

Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

Red Man’s View The (1909)

Director: D W Griffith

Cast: Mary Pickford, Alfred Paget, Kate Bruce, Charles Craig, Frank Evans, Edith Haldeman, Ruth Hart, Arthur V Johnson, James Kirkwood, Henry Lehrman, Owen Moore, George Nichols, Lottie Pickford, Mack Sennett, Dorothy West

14 min

DW Griffith 2

D W Griffith

Red Man's View The 1

The Red Man’s View is a 1909 American Western film directed by D. W. Griffith and shot in New York state. Prints of the film exist in the film archives of the Museum of Modern Art and the Library of Congress.[1]

According to the New York Dramatic Mirror, the film is about “the helpless Indian race as it has been forced to recede before the advancing white, and as such is full of poetic sentiment”.[2]

According to Scott Simon, “the film’s title works out to mean “The Red Man’s Point of View”, and for all the film’s difficulty in making drama from a long, passive march, there’s nothing like The Red Man’s View in Hollywood until John Ford’s Cheyenne Autumn more than fifty years later”.[3]

Red Man's View The 2

Cast

Red Man's View The 3

See also

Red Man's View The 4

References

  1. Jump up^ “Progressive Silent Film List: The Red Man’s View”. Silent Era. Retrieved 2008-07-16.
  2. Jump up^ Thomas Cripps, Hollywood’s High Noon: Moviemaking and Society Before Television, JHU Press, 1997, p. 27
  3. Jump up^ Scott Simon, The Invention of the Western Film: A Cultural History of the Genre’s First, Cambridge University Press, 2003, p. 55-56

Red Man's View The 5

 

Little Darling, The (1909)


Mary Pickford 1

Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

The Little Darling (1909)

Director: D W Griffith

Cast: Mary Pickford, Charles Avery, Robert Harron, Arthur V Johnson, James Kirkwood, Owen Moore, Lottie Pickford, Mack Sennett, Billy Quirk, Anthony O’Sullivan

3 min

DW Griffith 2

D W Griffith

Little Darling The 2

The Little Darling is a 1909 short film directed by D. W. Griffith. Released in split-reel for with Griffith’s The Sealed Room.[1]

Preserved from a paper print.

Cast

Little Darling The 1

References

External links

Little Darling The 3

Indian Runner’s Romance (1909)


Mary Pickford 1

Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

The Indian Runner’s Romance (1909)

Director: DW Griffith

Cast: Mary Pickford, Owen Moore, Frank Powell, Arthur V Johnson, James Kirkwood, Marion Leonard, Lottie Pickford, Mack Sennett

11 min

DW Griffith 2

D W Griffith

An Indian comforts a dying prospector in his last moments. In exchange, the prospector tells him the location of his gold claim. A group of cowboys tries to get the information and go as far as kidnapping the Indian’s wife.

D W Griffith made this film in 1909 for Biograph Productions.

Indian Runners Romance 2

 

Sealed Room, The (1909)


Mary Pickford 1

Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

Sealed Room, The (1909)

Director: D W Griffith

Cast: Mary Pickford, Arthur V Johnson, Marion Leonard, Henry B Whitehall, Linda Arvidson, Owen Moore, George Nichols, Mack Sennett

11 min

DW Griffith 2

D W Griffith

 

The Sealed Room is an eleven-minute film released in 1909. Directed by D.W. Griffith, the film’s cast included Arthur V. Johnson, Marion Leonard, Henry B. Walthall, Mary Pickford, and Mack Sennett. The film was also known as The Sealed Door.[1]

Released in split-reel with The Little Darling.

Sealed Room The 4

Plot

The film’s theme of immurement draws inspiration from Balzac‘s “La Grande Bretêche“,[2] and Edgar Allan Poe‘s “The Cask of Amontillado“. The king constructs a cozy, windowless love-nest for himself and his concubine. However, she is not faithful to her sovereign, but consorts with the court troubadour. In fact, they use the king’s new play chamber for their trysts. When the king discovers this, he sends for his masons. With the faithless duo still inside, the masons use stone and mortar to quietly seal the only door to the vault. The two lovers suffocate and the film ends.

Sealed Room The 11

Cast

others

Notes

  1. Jump up^ Langman, 1998, p. 34
  2. Jump up^ Gunning, 1994, pp. 177-178

References

Sealed Room The 1

1776 AKA The Hessian Renegades (1909)


Mary Pickford 1

Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

1776 AKA The Hessian Renegades (1909)

DW Griffith 2

D W Griffith 

Hessian Renegades The 4

 

The Hessian Renegades is a 1909 American silent drama film directed by D. W. Griffith.[1]

Plot

A young soldier during the American Revolution has the mission to carry a crucial message to General Washington but he is spotted by a group of enemy soldiers called Hessians. He finds refuge with a family, but the enemies soon discover him. After that the family and neighbors plan to find out a way to send the important message.

Hessian Renegades The 3

Cast

Hessian Renegades The 2

See also

References

Violin Maker of Cremona, The (1909)


Mary Pickford 1

Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

The Violin Maker of Cremona (1909)

Director: D W Griffith

Cast: Herbert Prior, Mary Pickford, Owen Moore, David Miles, Harry Solter, Marion Leonard, Charles Avery, Mack Sennett

DW Griffith 2

D W Griffith

The Violin Maker of Cremona is an American silent short film made in 1909  and directed by DW Griffith . This is Pickford’s first fully credited film. However, it is presently still unclear whether she had extras roles in previous Biograph films.

Story

Cremona held a competition on the best violin. If you win this game, you may marry the beautiful Gianinna. Two people start fighting for her hand.

Cast 

 Actor Role
Mary Pickford Giannina
Herbert Prior Taddeo Ferrari
Owen Moore Sandro
David Miles Filippo
Charles Avery Worker
Arthur V. Johnson Man in Audience
Anthony O’Sullivan Worker
Mack Sennett Man in Audience

Violin Maker of Cremona 3

Dream, The (1911)


Mary Pickford 1

Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

The Dream (1911)

Director: Thomas Ince

Cast: Mary Pickford, Owen Moore, Charles Arling, William Robert Daly, J Farrel MacDonald, Lottie Pickford

11 min

Dream The 1

The Dream is a 1911 short film, one reel, produced and released by the Independent Moving Pictures Company (IMP) and directed by Thomas H. Ince and George Loane Tucker. It starred Mary Pickford and her husband Owen Moore after they left working at the Biograph Company. This film is preserved at the Library of Congress, a rare survivor from Pickford’s IMP period. It appears on the Milestone Films DVD of Pickford’s 1918 feature Amarilly of Clothes-Line Alley.[1]

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Plot

The film opens in a fancy restaurant where the husband and a woman who is not his wife are polishing off a bottle of wine. Cut to home, where a dejected wife sits at the dining room table waiting for her husband. She briefly nods off before rousing and checking the wall clock indicating that it’s getting late. Cut back to the fancy restaurant, where the husband settles the check with a large wad of bills. The waiter obliges by helping the husband and his lady companion with their hats and coats. The other woman kicks the husbands hat out of his hand.

Six hours later, the husband strides through the door awakening his wife who is still sitting by the dining room table. He rebuffs her attempt to take his hat, whereupon she points to the wall clock. She draws his attention to dinner, which still sits on the dining table. He upends a few dishes then overturns a chair before collapsing on the sofa, cigarette in hand. Upset, the wife walks off camera and the scene fades to black.

Dream The 2

In the next scene, introduced by a title card stating “HIS DREAM”, the wife returns, clad in a form-fitting dress and a plumed hat. She awakens the husband by jostling his head. Talking animatedly, she downs a couple of glasses of wine from a decanter on the sideboard and tosses the wineglass on the floor. She drop-kicks a plate, lights up a cigarette, flicks the match at her husband, and blows smoke in his face. She pelts him with a pillow that has been lying on the floor, slings her coat over her arm, pulls down the curtains covering the door, and blows the husband a kiss goodbye. A well-appointed gentleman arrives at the front steps to their house a second or two before the wife steps out the front door and they leave together.

Confounded by what he has just witnessed, the husband grabs his hat and coat and leaves. The wife and her gentleman caller arrive by taxi at the fancy restaurant where they are shown to the same table the husband had occupied earlier. The husband arrives hot on their heels, briefly considers confronting them, but then flees, distressed by the whole affair. He stumbles out into the street before returning home. There he rants wildly, repeatedly grasping his forehead before settling down to compose a letter which reads in part “You’re not the woman I supposed you were.” Stumbling to the sideboard, he pulls out a small revolver from a drawer, points it at his abdomen, pulls the trigger, and collapses spasmodically on the sofa.

In the next scene, introduced by a title card stating “HIS AWAKENING”, he falls off the sofa and stands up, clutching his abdomen. His wife enters the scene, this time reclad in her modest attire, and startles him. He recounts his vivid experience, she comforts him and helps him realize it was all just a dream. While she turns her attention to preparing dessert on the dining room table, he pulls his address book from his suitcoat pocket and shreds it. Reconciled, they embrace and then settle down to eat the confection.

Dream The 3

Cast

References

 

Dream The 5

 

 

Sweet Memories (1911)


Mary Pickford 1

Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

Sweet Memories (1911)

Director: Thomas Ince

Cast: Mary Pickford, King Baggot, Owen Moore, William E Shay, Jack Pickford, Lottie Pickford, Charles Arling, J. Farrell MacDonald, Charlotte Smith

 10 min

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Sweet Memories (also known as Sweet Memories of Yesterday and Sweetheart Days) is a 1911 silent short romantic drama film, written and directed by Thomas H. Ince, released by the Independent Moving Pictures Company on March 27, 1911.[1]

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Thomas H Ince

Plot

Polly Biblett (Mary Pickford), a young lady, tells her grandmother Lettie about her new boyfriend. The news provokes the elderly woman to reminisce about her own sweetheart, long time before. The touching sequence expresses the power of lives going on, the older woman aging as her grandchildren grow and knowing they will soon have children of their own.

Cast

References

sweetmem2

In Old Madrid (1911)


Mary Pickford 1

Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

In Old Madrid (1911)

Director: Thomas H Ince

Cast: Mary Pickford, Owen Moore

11 min

In Old Madrid (1911) is a Mary Pickford film directed by Thomas H Ince.

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Thomas H Ince

Synopsis

Don Gomez writes a letter to the parents of Zelda, a young Spanish girl, regretting his inability to pay them a visit, but sends his son, Jose, instead. Jose arrives and is immediately smitten by the charms of Zelda. Zelda indulges in a little flirtation.

Her mother inaugurates a system of espionage that is very inconvenient for the lovers. They are surprised by the duenna-like mother and are driven to desperation.

Zelda has a girlfriend about her age who resembles her and is attired to represent a clever counterpart of Zelda. The mother walks in the garden accompanied by Zelda. Seating herself on a bench, she commands the girl to repose beside her. Finding the vigil rather tiresome, the elder woman lapses into a state of drowsiness, and the companions of Zelda beckon her to join them.

So clever is the disguise of Rosa that Jose is deceived and he kisses her. The father of Zelda discovers the act and hastens to the mother to inform her only to see Zelda yawning beside his wife on the bench. Exhausted, the guardian falls asleep, and Rosa exchanges places with Zelda, who joins her lover. Jose induces Zelda to accompany him to the seashore.

He gathers the girl in his arms, and wades across a stretch of water, and they take a perilous position on the rocks. A search is instituted and Zelda and Jose are discovered on the rocks. Jose has a scheme which he quickly imparts to Zelda and she acquiesces. The irate parents see the daughter and her lover.

Jose is firm and threatens to throw Zelda into the roaring torrent, unless the parents consent to their immediate marriage. The agonized parents relent. The obdurate parents have been outwitted by the scheming lovers.

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In Old Madrid

Lonely Villa, The (1909)


Mary Pickford 1

Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

Lonely Villa, The (1909)

This is one of the earliest surviving prints from the beginning of Mary Pickford’s career. It is assumed to have been her 9th film.

Director: D W Griffith

Cast: David Miles, Marion Leonard, Mary Pickford, Gladys Egan, Adele DeGarde, Robert Harron, James Kirkwood, Florence Lawrence, Owen Moore, Mack Sennett

8 min

Lonely Villa The 3

The Lonely Villa (1909)

The Lonely Villa is a 1909 American short silent crime drama film directed by D. W. Griffith. The film stars David Miles, Marion Leonard and Mary Pickford in one of her first film roles. It is based on the 1901 French play Au Telephone (At the Telephone) by André de Lorde.[1] A print of The Lonely Villa survives and is currently in the public domain.[2]

Lonely Villa The 2

Plot

A group of criminals waits until a wealthy man goes out to break into his house and threaten his wife and daughters. They refuge themselves inside one of the rooms, but the thieves break in. The father finds out what is happening and runs back home to try to save his family.

Cast

Lonely Villa The 4

Production notes and release

The Lonely Villa was produced by the Biograph Company and shot in Fort Lee, New Jersey.[3][4] It was released on June 10, 1909 along with another D.W. Griffith split-reel film, A New Trick.[2]

See also

Lonely Villa The 5

References

  1. Jump up^ Choi, Jinhee; Wada-Marciano, Mitsuyo, eds. (2001). Horror to the Extreme: Changing Boundaries in Asian Cinema. Hong Kong University Press. p. 111. ISBN 962-209-973-4.
  2. ^ Jump up to:a b “Progressive Silent Film List: The Lonely Villa”. Silent Era. Retrieved June 24, 2008.
  3. Jump up^ Koszarski, Richard. Fort Lee: The Film Town. John Libbey Publishing. p. 58. ISBN 0-86196-653-8.
  4. Jump up^ “Studios and Films”. Fort Lee Film Commission. Retrieved May 30, 2011.

 

Lonely Villa The 6

 

Cinderella (1914)


Mary Pickford 1

Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

Cinderella (1914)

Dir: James Kirkwood

Cast: Mary Pickford, Owen Moore, Isabel Vernon, Georgia Wilson, Lucille Carney, W N Cone, Inez Ranous, Hayward Mack

52 min

 

 

Cinderella is a 1914 silent film starring Mary Pickford, directed by James Kirkwood, Sr., produced by Daniel Frohman, and released by Famous Players Film Company. The film is based upon the fairy tale Cinderella. The film was released on Blu-ray & DVD as a bonus feature from the DVD of Through the Back Door (1921).[1]

Contents

PlotEdit

Cinderella is a kind young woman who lives with her wicked stepmother and ugly stepsisters plus her evil father. They abuse her and use her as the house maid. Cinderella thinks she’s all alone in the world, but doesn’t know a fairy godmother is constantly helping her. One day, she is collecting wood from the forest and meets Prince Charming. They immediately fall in love with each other, but lose contact. Soon, a ball is arranged by the prince to look for his future wife. The stepsisters think they make a great chance in being chosen by the prince. Cinderella wants to go as well, but isn’t allowed to by her cruel family.

The sisters go to a fortune teller, who announces a member of the family will be chosen by the prince. The sisters are delighted and think it will be one of the two of them. When they leave for the ball, Cinderella is left behind. The fairy godmother appears and asks if she wants to go to the ball as well. When Cinderella responds positively, the fairy godmother orders her to bring her the biggest pumpkin she can find. Cinderella does so and the fairy godmother changes it into a luxurious stage coach. She next asks for the smallest mice she can find. Cinderella brings her some mice from the house and the fairy godmother changes them into horses.

The fairy godmother next orders her to bring her the biggest rats there are. After Cinderella collected them, the fairy godmother changes them into servants. She finally changes Cinderella’s poor maiden costume into a dress fit for a princess, and glass slippers, of course. She reminds Cinderella she will have to be back at home before the clock strikes midnight. Otherwise, her fine dress will turn into rags and the coach and servants will become what they were before.

As Cinderella arrives at the party, Prince Charming is already busy looking for his future wife. It is soon announced an unknown lady has arrived in a coach. Prince Charming immediately chooses her and they go to a private place where they learn to know each other. As they flirt, Cinderella notices it is almost twelve o’clock and storms out. She loses her glass slipper, before she turns into her old poor self again.

The next day, the royal heralds announce the Prince’s wish to marry the woman whose foot fits the lost glass slipper. The sisters go to the palace to try fit their feet into the slippers, while Cinderella is yet again forced to stay home. It becomes clear the royal heralds every woman of the town has tried but failed to wear the slippers, except for Cinderella. Prince Charming immediately goes to visit her and is shocked when he finds out she is a poor maid. He doesn’t turn his back against her, though, and he invites her to try on the slipper. When she does, she is announced as the future princess. The royal heralds give her the opportunity to behead her sisters, but she refuses to.

In the final scene, the fairy godmother appears and blesses her. Cinderella and Prince Charming live happily ever after.

CastEdi

 

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