Tag Archives: silent cinema

Country Doctor, The (1909)


Mary Pickford 1

Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

The Country Doctor (1909)

Director: D W Griffith

Cast: Mary Pickford, Kate Bruce, Adele DeGarde, Gladys Egan, Rose King, Florence Lawrence, Frank Powell, 

14 min

DW Griffith 2

D W Griffith

Country Doctor The 1

The Country Doctor is a 1909 American short silent drama film written and directed by D. W. Griffith. Currently in the public domain, prints of The Country Doctor are preserved at the film archives of the Museum of Modern Art and the Library of Congress.[1]

Plot

A doctor (Frank Powell) leaves his sick daughter (Adele DeGarde) to assist a neighbor that is gravely ill, and ignores his wife’s requests to come home and take care of his own daughter who is getting worse.

Country Doctor The 3

Cast

Country Doctor The 4

See also

Country Doctor The 5

References

Country Doctor The 7

Country Doctor The 8

Country Doctor The 9

Country Doctor The 10

The Gibson Goddess (1909)


Mary Pickford 1

Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

The Gibson Goddess (1909)

Director: D W Griffith

Cast: Mary Pickford, Marion Leonard, Kate Bruce, Frank Evans, Arthur V Johnson, James Kirkwood, George Nichols, Anthony O’Sullivan, Billy Quirk, Mack Sennett, Dorothy West

6 min

DW Griffith 2

D W Griffith

Gibson Goddess The 1

 

The Gibson Goddess is a 1909 short comedy film directed by D. W. Griffith. It stars Marion Leonard.[1][2]

Cast

Gibson Goddess The 2

References

 

 

 

Narrow Road, The (1912)


Mary Pickford 1

Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

The Narrow Road (1912)

Director: D W Griffith

Cast: Mary Pickford, Elmer Booth, Charles Hill Mailes, Jack Pickford, Christy Cabanne, Max Davidson, Grace Henderson, Adolph Lestina, Alfred Paget, Harry Hyde, Frank Evans

17 Min

DW Griffith 2

D W Griffith

Narrow Road The 7

 

The Narrow Road is a 1912 short silent film directed by D. W. Griffith and produced and distributed by the Biograph Company.[1]

A short Biograph film preserved from the Library of Congress paperprint collection.[2]

Narrow Road The 6

Cast

other cast

Narrow Road The 5

References

  1. Jump up^ The Narrow Road at silentera.com
  2. Jump up^ Catalog of Holdings The American Film Institute Collection and The United Artists Collection at The Library of Congress p. 125 c.1978 by The American Film Institute

Narrow Road The 4

Narrow Road The 3

Narrow Road The 2

Narrow Road The 1

Red Man’s View, The (1909)


Mary Pickford 1

Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

Red Man’s View The (1909)

Director: D W Griffith

Cast: Mary Pickford, Alfred Paget, Kate Bruce, Charles Craig, Frank Evans, Edith Haldeman, Ruth Hart, Arthur V Johnson, James Kirkwood, Henry Lehrman, Owen Moore, George Nichols, Lottie Pickford, Mack Sennett, Dorothy West

14 min

DW Griffith 2

D W Griffith

Red Man's View The 1

The Red Man’s View is a 1909 American Western film directed by D. W. Griffith and shot in New York state. Prints of the film exist in the film archives of the Museum of Modern Art and the Library of Congress.[1]

According to the New York Dramatic Mirror, the film is about “the helpless Indian race as it has been forced to recede before the advancing white, and as such is full of poetic sentiment”.[2]

According to Scott Simon, “the film’s title works out to mean “The Red Man’s Point of View”, and for all the film’s difficulty in making drama from a long, passive march, there’s nothing like The Red Man’s View in Hollywood until John Ford’s Cheyenne Autumn more than fifty years later”.[3]

Red Man's View The 2

Cast

Red Man's View The 3

See also

Red Man's View The 4

References

  1. Jump up^ “Progressive Silent Film List: The Red Man’s View”. Silent Era. Retrieved 2008-07-16.
  2. Jump up^ Thomas Cripps, Hollywood’s High Noon: Moviemaking and Society Before Television, JHU Press, 1997, p. 27
  3. Jump up^ Scott Simon, The Invention of the Western Film: A Cultural History of the Genre’s First, Cambridge University Press, 2003, p. 55-56

Red Man's View The 5

 

Amarilly of Clothes-Line Alley (1918)


Mary Pickford 1

Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

Amarilly of Clothes-Line Alley (1918)

Director: Marshall Neilan

Cast: Mary Pickford, William Scott, Kate Price, Ida Waterman, Norman Kerry, Fred Goodwin, Margaret Landis, Tom Wilson, Gustav Von Seyffertitz, Leo White

67 min

Marshall Neilan 1

Marshall Neilan

Amarilly 1

Amarilly 2

Amarilly 7

 

Amarilly of Clothes-Line Alley is a 1918 American silent comedy romance film starring Mary Pickford that was directed by Marshall Neilan and written by Frances Marion based upon a novel by Belle K. Maniates.[2]

Amarilly 3

Plot

Set in San Francisco during the early 1900s, the film revolves around Amarilly (Mary Pickford), the daughter of a widowed scrubwoman. Amarilly is proud of her hard-working Irish family, and takes care of her five roughhouse brothers. She is engaged to bartender Terry McGowan (William Scott), who gets her a job as a cigarette girl in his cafe after a fire unfairly causes her to lose her job as a theater scrubwoman. While working as a cigarette girl, she meets Gordon Phillips (Norman Kerry), a handsome and wealthy but frivolous young man, who is a society sculptor.

Terry becomes jealous when Amarilly starts hanging out with Gordon, and he breaks off the engagement. Gordon offers Amarilly a job with his wealthy and snobbish aunt, Mrs. Phillips (Ida Waterman). When the neighborhood is quarantined after a breakout of scarlet fever, Mrs. Phillips decides to take the time to teach Amarilly high class manners in a Pygmalion-like experiment. However, once she discovers her nephew has fallen in love with Amarilly, she turns against her. Mrs. Phillips tries to humiliate Amarilly by inviting her family over for a social party.

Amarilly 6

Amarilly is outraged and returns to her old home. She sees Terry and invites him for supper. He is delighted, and on the way to her house, he stops to buy expensive 50 cent violets, even though he had earlier passed up violets at 15 cents. He is shot by accident, and barely makes it to Amarilly’s house before collapsing. Fortunately, Terry survives. Amarilly visits him in the hospital and tells him that when he gets out, they have a date at City Hall.

The final scene is five years later. Amarilly is in a side car on Terry’s motor bike; they both are nicely dressed and seem to be doing well. Then it is revealed under the blanket she has a baby, and behind Terry is a little boy.

Amarilly 8

Cast

unbilled

Amarilly 5

Reception

Like many American films of the time, Amarilly of Clothes-Line Alley was subject to cuts by city and state film censorship boards. For example, the Chicago Board of Censors required a cut, i Reel 1, of a closeup of money in a man’s hand and, Reel 4, maid opening door to alleged house of ill-fame and man entering.[3]

References

  1. Jump up^ Moviemeter (Dutch) Running time
  2. Jump up^ Progressive Silent Film List: Amarilly of Clothes-Line Alley at silentera.com
  3. Jump up^ “Official Cut-Outs by the Chicago Board of Censors”. Exhibitors Herald. New York City: Exhibitors Herald Company. 6 (15): 33. April 6, 1918.

Amarilly 9

 

 

 

Arcadian Maid, An (1910)


Mary Pickford 1

Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

An Arcadian Maid (1910)

Director: D W Griffith

Cast: Mary Pickford, Mack Sennett, George Nichols, Kate Bruce, Edward Dillon, William J Butler, Henry Lehrman, Anthony O’Sullivan, Vivian Prescott

16 min

DW Griffith 2

D W Griffith

An Arcadian Maid is a 1910 American silent film directed by D.W. Griffith.

Arcadian Maid An 2

Plot

Mary Pickford plays Priscilla an unemployed maid who finds work at a farm. There she meets a no-good peddler who starts flirting with her and makes her fall in love with him. He runs up a gambling bill and asks her to help him pay his debts or he won’t be able to marry her.[1]

Cast

Arcadian Maid An 1

See also

References

Renunciation, The (1909)


Mary Pickford 1

Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

The Renunciation (1909)

Director: D W Griffith

Cast: Mary Pickford, Anthony O’Sullivan, James Kirkwood, Harry Solter, Billy Quirk, Edwin August, Arthur V Johnson, Wilfred Lucas

11 min

DW Griffith 2

D W Griffith

Renunciation The 2

The Renunciation is a 1909 silent short film directed by D. W. Griffith and st

arring Mary Pickford. It was produced and distributed by the Biograph Company.[1][2]

Cast

Renunciation The 4

other cast

Renunciation The 1

References

Usurer, The (1910)


Mary Pickford 1

Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

The Usurer (1910)

Director: D W Griffith

Cast: Mary Pickford, George Nichols, Grace Henderson, Mack Sennett, Edward Dillon, Anthony O’Sullivan, Alfred Paget, Kate Bruce, Henry B Walthall, Claire McDowell, Linda Arvidson, Florence Barker, Dorothy West

17 min

DW Griffith 2

D W Griffith

The Usurer is a silent short film made in 1910 directed by David W. Griffith for Biograph Company .

Griffith employs many of his favorite actors of that period: Linda Arvidson (wife of Griffith), George Nichols (in the title role), Jeanie Macpherson , who three years later will start a successful career as a screenwriter and the young Mary Pickford in a young girl invalid role.

Usurer, The 1

Plot 

A wealthy, callous moneylender finds a terrifying way to learn about money’s limitations.

Usurer, The 2

Production 

The short film was produced by the Biograph Company . It was shot – from 10 to 15 July 1910 – in New York, at the Biograph studios on Fourteenth Street [1] .

Distribution 

Distributed by the Biograph Company , this film was released in US cinemas on August 15, 1910. A copy of the film is kept in the archives of the Library of Congress and Museum of Modern Art . The rights of the film are in the public domain [1] .

In 2002, Kino on Video published an anthology on DVD entitled Griffith Masterworks: Biograph Shorts (1908-1914) lasting 362 minutes which also contained this film in a version of 18 minutes [2] .

Notes 

See also 

 

Usurer, The 3

Getting Even (1909)


Mary Pickford 1

Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

Getting Even (1909)

Director: D W Griffith

Cast: Mary Pickford, Billy Quirk, James Kirkwood, Edwin August, Florence Barker, Kate Bruce, Arthur V Johnson, Florence La Badie, George Nichols, Lottie Pickford, Henry B Walthall, Mack Sennett

6 min

DW Griffith 2

D W Griffith

Getting Even is a 1909 American silent short comedy film directed by D. W. Griffith. A print of the film exists in the film archive of the Library of Congress.[1]

Cast

References

  1. Jump up^ “Her First Biscuits”. Silent Era. Retrieved 6 December 2014.

Getting Even 1

 

Sons Return, The (1909)


Mary Pickford 1

Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

The Son’s Return (1909)

Director: D W Griffith

Cast: Mary Pickford, Charles West, Herbert Prior, Anita Hendrie, Harry Solter, Arthur V Johnson, David Miles, Frank Powell, Billy Quirk, Edwin August, Charles Avery

11 min

DW Griffith 2

D W Griffith

 

The Son’s Return is a silent short film made in 1909 and directed by D W. Griffith . Produced and distributed by the Biograph Company , the film – shot in Coytesville, New Jersey – was released in theaters June 14, 1909.

Turns out to be the first film adaptation of a novel by Guy de Maupassant [1] .

Plot 

The son leaves home to go to town to seek his fortune. After many years, back in the parents’ inn that did not recognize him but, noting his bulging portfolio of notes, plan to rob the unknown customer.

Production 

The film was produced by the Biograph Company. He was shot in New Jersey to Coytesville and Leonia .

Sons Return 3

Distribution 

Distributed by the Biograph Company, the film – a short film in a coil – was released in US theaters on June 14, 1909. The film was mastered and poured on DVD. Released in 2006 by Grapevine, it has been included in an anthology titled DW Griffith, Director – Volume 3 (1909) which has a dozen titles for a total of 112 minutes [2] .

Notes 

  1. ^ According to the ‘ IMDb
  2. ^ Silent was DVD

See also 

Sons Return 1

A Beast at Bay (1912)


Mary Pickford 1

Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

A Beast At Bay (1912)

Director: D W Griffith

Cast: Mary Pickford, Edwin August, Alfred Paget, Mae Marsh, Marguerite Marsh, Robert Harron, Henry Lehrman, Lottie Pickford, Charles West, Francis J Grandon

17 min

DW Griffith 2

D W Griffith

Beast at Bay 3

A Beast at Bay is a 1912 silent short film directed by D. W. Griffith. It was produced and distributed by the Biograph Company. Preserved in paper print form at the Library of Congress.[1]

Beast at Bay 1

Cast

Rest of cast

References

  1. Jump up^ Catalog of Holdings The American Film Institute Collections and The United Artists Collection at The Library of Congress (<-book title) p.13 c.1978 by the American Film Institute

Beast at Bay 4

D W Griffith and G W Bitzer

1776 AKA The Hessian Renegades (1909)


Mary Pickford 1

Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

1776 AKA The Hessian Renegades (1909)

DW Griffith 2

D W Griffith 

Hessian Renegades The 4

 

The Hessian Renegades is a 1909 American silent drama film directed by D. W. Griffith.[1]

Plot

A young soldier during the American Revolution has the mission to carry a crucial message to General Washington but he is spotted by a group of enemy soldiers called Hessians. He finds refuge with a family, but the enemies soon discover him. After that the family and neighbors plan to find out a way to send the important message.

Hessian Renegades The 3

Cast

Hessian Renegades The 2

See also

References

As It Is In Life (1910)


Mary Pickford  1.jpg

Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

As It Is In Life (1910)

Director: D W Griffith

Cast: Mary Pickford, George Nichols, Gladys Egan, Marion Leonard, Charles West, Frank Opperman, Mack Sennett

16 min

DW Griffith 2

D W Griffith

As It Is In Life is a 1910 silent short film directed by D. W. Griffith and produced and distributed by the Biograph Company. Mary Pickford appears in the film.[1]

The film is preserved from Library of Congress paper prints.[2]

As It Is In LIfe 3

Cast

other cast

See also

References

Unchanging Sea, The (1910)


Mary Pickford 1

Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

The Unchanging Sea (1910)

Director: D W Griffith

Cast: Arthur V Johnson, Linda Arvidson, Gladys Egan, Mary Pickford, Charles West, Dell Henderson, Dorothy West

DW Griffith 2

D W Griffith

 

The Unchanging Sea is a 1910 American drama film that was directed by D. W. Griffith. A print of the film survives in the Library of Congress film archive.[1]

Unchanging Sea, The 7

Cast

See also

References[edit]

Unchanging Sea, The 2

Violin Maker of Cremona, The (1909)


Mary Pickford 1

Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

The Violin Maker of Cremona (1909)

Director: D W Griffith

Cast: Herbert Prior, Mary Pickford, Owen Moore, David Miles, Harry Solter, Marion Leonard, Charles Avery, Mack Sennett

DW Griffith 2

D W Griffith

The Violin Maker of Cremona is an American silent short film made in 1909  and directed by DW Griffith . This is Pickford’s first fully credited film. However, it is presently still unclear whether she had extras roles in previous Biograph films.

Story

Cremona held a competition on the best violin. If you win this game, you may marry the beautiful Gianinna. Two people start fighting for her hand.

Cast 

 Actor Role
Mary Pickford Giannina
Herbert Prior Taddeo Ferrari
Owen Moore Sandro
David Miles Filippo
Charles Avery Worker
Arthur V. Johnson Man in Audience
Anthony O’Sullivan Worker
Mack Sennett Man in Audience

Violin Maker of Cremona 3

Little Princess, The (1917)


Mary Pickford 1

Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

The Little Princess (1917)

Director: Marshall Neilan, Howard Hawks

Cast: Mary Pickford, Norman Kerry, Katherine Griffith, Anne Schaefer, Zasu Pitts, WE Lawrence, Theodore Roberts, Gertrude Short, Gustav von Seyffertitz, Loretta Blake, George A McDaniel, Edythe Chapman, Josephine Hutchinson, Joan Marsh, Joe Murphy

62 min

A Little Princess is a 1917 American silent film directed by Marshall Neilan based upon the novel A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett. This version is notable for having been adapted by famed female screenwriter Frances Marion.[1]

Marshall Neilan 1

Marshall Neilan

Howard Hawks 1 Howard Hawks

Contents

Plot 

As described in a film magazine,[2] Sara Crewe (Pickford) is treated as a little princess at the Minchin boarding school for children until it is learned that her father has lost his entire fortune, and she is made a slavey (a household servant). She and Becky (Pitts), another slavey, become close friends who share their joys and sorrows.

Little Princess The 9

Christmastime draws near and the girls watch the preparations wistfully. Their loneliness arouses the sympathy of a servant of the rich Mr. Carrisford. On the night before Christmas he prepares a spread for the slaveys in their attic. He calls his master Mr. Carrisford (von Seyffertitz) to watch their joy, but both are witness to the slaveys being abused and whipped by Miss Minchin (Griffith). Carrisford interferes and learns that Sara is the daughter of his best friend. He adopts Sara and Becky and in their new home they have a real Christmas.

Little Princess The 4

The film opens with Sarah’s father moving back to London after serving in the British Army in India. She is opposed to leaving the luxurious life of an officer’s child with a large house and many servants, and is initially shy when enrolled in Miss Minchin’s School. Her reputation as “the little princess” precedes her and the other girls are fascinated with her tales of life in India. The girls sneak into Sarah’s room at night to listen to her stories. One night, she tells “Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves” which becomes a story within a story with elaborate exotic sets and costumes.

Little Princess The 10

Cast

References

  1. Jump up^ Progressive Silent Film List: A Little Princess at silentera.com
  2. Jump up^ “Reviews: A Little Princess. Exhibitors Herald. New York: Exhibitors Herald Company. 5 (22): 29. November 24, 1917.

Little Princess The 8

Dream, The (1911)


Mary Pickford 1

Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

The Dream (1911)

Director: Thomas Ince

Cast: Mary Pickford, Owen Moore, Charles Arling, William Robert Daly, J Farrel MacDonald, Lottie Pickford

11 min

Dream The 1

The Dream is a 1911 short film, one reel, produced and released by the Independent Moving Pictures Company (IMP) and directed by Thomas H. Ince and George Loane Tucker. It starred Mary Pickford and her husband Owen Moore after they left working at the Biograph Company. This film is preserved at the Library of Congress, a rare survivor from Pickford’s IMP period. It appears on the Milestone Films DVD of Pickford’s 1918 feature Amarilly of Clothes-Line Alley.[1]

47cd13265547c46bab0641c111d327aa

Plot

The film opens in a fancy restaurant where the husband and a woman who is not his wife are polishing off a bottle of wine. Cut to home, where a dejected wife sits at the dining room table waiting for her husband. She briefly nods off before rousing and checking the wall clock indicating that it’s getting late. Cut back to the fancy restaurant, where the husband settles the check with a large wad of bills. The waiter obliges by helping the husband and his lady companion with their hats and coats. The other woman kicks the husbands hat out of his hand.

Six hours later, the husband strides through the door awakening his wife who is still sitting by the dining room table. He rebuffs her attempt to take his hat, whereupon she points to the wall clock. She draws his attention to dinner, which still sits on the dining table. He upends a few dishes then overturns a chair before collapsing on the sofa, cigarette in hand. Upset, the wife walks off camera and the scene fades to black.

Dream The 2

In the next scene, introduced by a title card stating “HIS DREAM”, the wife returns, clad in a form-fitting dress and a plumed hat. She awakens the husband by jostling his head. Talking animatedly, she downs a couple of glasses of wine from a decanter on the sideboard and tosses the wineglass on the floor. She drop-kicks a plate, lights up a cigarette, flicks the match at her husband, and blows smoke in his face. She pelts him with a pillow that has been lying on the floor, slings her coat over her arm, pulls down the curtains covering the door, and blows the husband a kiss goodbye. A well-appointed gentleman arrives at the front steps to their house a second or two before the wife steps out the front door and they leave together.

Confounded by what he has just witnessed, the husband grabs his hat and coat and leaves. The wife and her gentleman caller arrive by taxi at the fancy restaurant where they are shown to the same table the husband had occupied earlier. The husband arrives hot on their heels, briefly considers confronting them, but then flees, distressed by the whole affair. He stumbles out into the street before returning home. There he rants wildly, repeatedly grasping his forehead before settling down to compose a letter which reads in part “You’re not the woman I supposed you were.” Stumbling to the sideboard, he pulls out a small revolver from a drawer, points it at his abdomen, pulls the trigger, and collapses spasmodically on the sofa.

In the next scene, introduced by a title card stating “HIS AWAKENING”, he falls off the sofa and stands up, clutching his abdomen. His wife enters the scene, this time reclad in her modest attire, and startles him. He recounts his vivid experience, she comforts him and helps him realize it was all just a dream. While she turns her attention to preparing dessert on the dining room table, he pulls his address book from his suitcoat pocket and shreds it. Reconciled, they embrace and then settle down to eat the confection.

Dream The 3

Cast

References

 

Dream The 5

 

 

Sweet Memories (1911)


Mary Pickford 1

Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

Sweet Memories (1911)

Director: Thomas Ince

Cast: Mary Pickford, King Baggot, Owen Moore, William E Shay, Jack Pickford, Lottie Pickford, Charles Arling, J. Farrell MacDonald, Charlotte Smith

 10 min

hqdefault (1)

Sweet Memories (also known as Sweet Memories of Yesterday and Sweetheart Days) is a 1911 silent short romantic drama film, written and directed by Thomas H. Ince, released by the Independent Moving Pictures Company on March 27, 1911.[1]

47cd13265547c46bab0641c111d327aa

Thomas H Ince

Plot

Polly Biblett (Mary Pickford), a young lady, tells her grandmother Lettie about her new boyfriend. The news provokes the elderly woman to reminisce about her own sweetheart, long time before. The touching sequence expresses the power of lives going on, the older woman aging as her grandchildren grow and knowing they will soon have children of their own.

Cast

References

sweetmem2

Lonely Villa, The (1909)


Mary Pickford 1

Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

Lonely Villa, The (1909)

This is one of the earliest surviving prints from the beginning of Mary Pickford’s career. It is assumed to have been her 9th film.

Director: D W Griffith

Cast: David Miles, Marion Leonard, Mary Pickford, Gladys Egan, Adele DeGarde, Robert Harron, James Kirkwood, Florence Lawrence, Owen Moore, Mack Sennett

8 min

Lonely Villa The 3

The Lonely Villa (1909)

The Lonely Villa is a 1909 American short silent crime drama film directed by D. W. Griffith. The film stars David Miles, Marion Leonard and Mary Pickford in one of her first film roles. It is based on the 1901 French play Au Telephone (At the Telephone) by André de Lorde.[1] A print of The Lonely Villa survives and is currently in the public domain.[2]

Lonely Villa The 2

Plot

A group of criminals waits until a wealthy man goes out to break into his house and threaten his wife and daughters. They refuge themselves inside one of the rooms, but the thieves break in. The father finds out what is happening and runs back home to try to save his family.

Cast

Lonely Villa The 4

Production notes and release

The Lonely Villa was produced by the Biograph Company and shot in Fort Lee, New Jersey.[3][4] It was released on June 10, 1909 along with another D.W. Griffith split-reel film, A New Trick.[2]

See also

Lonely Villa The 5

References

  1. Jump up^ Choi, Jinhee; Wada-Marciano, Mitsuyo, eds. (2001). Horror to the Extreme: Changing Boundaries in Asian Cinema. Hong Kong University Press. p. 111. ISBN 962-209-973-4.
  2. ^ Jump up to:a b “Progressive Silent Film List: The Lonely Villa”. Silent Era. Retrieved June 24, 2008.
  3. Jump up^ Koszarski, Richard. Fort Lee: The Film Town. John Libbey Publishing. p. 58. ISBN 0-86196-653-8.
  4. Jump up^ “Studios and Films”. Fort Lee Film Commission. Retrieved May 30, 2011.

 

Lonely Villa The 6

 

New York Hat, The (1912)


Mary Pickford 1

Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

New York Hat, The (1912)

Director: D W Griffith

Cast: Mary Pickford, Charles Hill Mailes, Kate Bruce, Lionel Barrymore, Alfred Paget, Claire McDowell, Mae Marsh, Madge Kirby, Lillian Gish, Jack Pickford, Robert Harron, Dorothy Gish, Mack Sennett

16 min

DW Griffith 2

D W Griffith

New York Hat, The 1

The New York Hat (1912)

New York Hat, The 2

The New York Hat (1912)

New York Hat, The 3

The New York Hat (1912)

New York Hat, The 4

The New York Hat (1912)

New York Hat, The 5

The New York Hat (1912)

 

The New York Hat (1912) is a short silent film directed by D. W. Griffith from a screenplay by Anita Loos, and starring Mary Pickford, Lionel Barrymore, and Lillian Gish.

Production

The New York Hat is one of the most notable of the Biograph Studios short films and is perhaps the best known example of Pickford’s early work, and an example of Anita Loos‘s witty writing. The film was made by Biograph when it and many other early U.S. movie studios were based in Fort Lee, New Jersey at the beginning of the 20th century.[1][2][3]

New York Hat, The 6

Plot

Mollie Goodhue leads a cheerless, impoverished life, largely because of her stern, miserly father. Mrs. Goodhue is mortally ill, but before dying, she gives the minister, Preacher Bolton, some money with which to buy her daughter the “finery” her father always forbade her.

Mollie is delighted when the minister presents her with a fashionable New York hat she has been longing for, but village gossips misinterpret the minister’s intentions and spread malicious rumors. Mollie becomes a social pariah, and her father tears up the beloved hat in a rage.

All ends well, however, after the minister produces a letter from Mollie’s mother about the money she left the minister to spend on Mollie. Soon afterwards, he proposes to Mollie, who accepts his offer of marriage.

New York Hat, The 7

Cast

New York Hat, The 8

See also

References

  1. Jump up^ Koszarski, Richard (2004), Fort Lee: The Film Town, Rome, Italy: John Libbey Publishing -CIC srl, ISBN 0-86196-653-8
  2. Jump up^ Amith, Deninis (January 1, 2011). “Before there was Hollywood there was Fort Lee, NJ”. J!-ENT.
  3. Jump up^ The New York Hat at silentera.com
  4. Jump up^ “The New York Hat”. Library of Congress. Retrieved 28 December 2011.

New York Hat, The 9New York Hat, The 10

The Female of the Species (1912)


Mary Pickford 1

Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

Female of the Species, The (1912)

Director: D W Griffith

Cast: Charles West, Claire McDowell, Mary Pickford, Dorothy Bernard

17 min

DW Griffith 2

D W Griffith

Female of the Species 2

The Female of the Species (1912)

Female of the Species 1

The Female of the Species (1912)

The Female of the Species is a 1912 short film directed by D. W. Griffith.[1]

Cast

References

 

Female of the Species 3

Johanna Enlists (1918)


Mary Pickford 1

Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

Johanna Enlists (1918)

Director: William Desmond Taylor

Cast: Mary Pickford, Anne Schaefer, Fred Huntley, Monte Blue, Douglas MacLean, Emory Johnson, John Steppling, Wallace Beery, Wesley Barry, June Prentis, Jean Prentis, Joan Marsh (uncredited), Bull Montana (uncredited)

72 min

Johanna Enlists 1

Johanna Enlists 2

Johanna Enlists 3

Mary Pickford with Frances Marion – Female Hollywood Pioneers

Johanna Enlists 4

Mary Pickford with Frances Marion – Female Hollywood Pioneers

Johanna Enlists 5

Mary Pickford in Johanna Enlists 

Johanna Enlists 6 Mary Pickford behind the camera

Johanna Enlists 7

Mary Pickford taking a picture of Douglas Fairbanks 

Johanna Enlists is a 1918 silent film comedy-drama produced by and starring Mary Pickford with distributed by Paramount Pictures. The film was directed by William Desmond Taylor from a short story by Rupert Hughes, The Mobilization of Johanna. Frances Marion, a frequent Pickford collaborator, wrote the scenario. The film was made at a time during World War I when sentimental or patriotic films were immensely popular. It was an early starring vehicle for Monte Blue, the male lead opposite Pickford. The film survives in several prints, including one at the Library of Congress.[1][2][3]

Johanna Enlists 8

Plot

As described in a film magazine,[4] Johanna Renssaller (Pickford), an uncouth, freckled country lass, works from dawn until late at night. Her only love affairs were with the hired man and a “beautiful brakeman” on the railroad. The hired man proved to be married and the brakeman proved impossible. She prayed for a beau, and then a whole regiment of soldiers came along and camped on the farm. Everyone from Captain Archie van Renssaller (MacLean) down to Prvate Vibbard (Blue) fell in love with her, ate her pies, and sat in her hammock. She took milk baths and tried Isadora Duncan style calisthenics and finally fell in love with Captain van Renssaller. When the troops moved on, she rode at the head of the officer staff.

Johanna Enlists 9

Cast

Reception

Like many American films of the time, Johanna Enlists was subject to cuts by city and state film censorship boards. For example, the Chicago Board of Censors required a cut, in Reel 4, of views of a nude figure in a book.[5]

References

  1. Jump up^ The American Film Institute Catalog Feature films: 1911–20 published by The American Film Institute, c. 1988
  2. Jump up^ Progressive Silent Film List: Johanna Enlists at silentera.com
  3. Jump up^ Catalog of Holdings The American Film Institute Collection and The United Artists Collection at The Library of Congress, p. 93 by The American Film Institute, c. 1978
  4. Jump up^ “Reviews: Johanna Enlists. Exhibitors Herald. New York City: Exhibitors Herald Company. 7 (14): 28. September 28, 1918.
  5. Jump up^ “Official Cut-Outs by the Chicago Board of Censors”. Exhibitors Herald. New York City: Exhibitors Herald Company. 7 (17): 43. October 19, 1918.

Johanna Enlists 10

Suds (1920)


Mary Pickford 1

Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

Suds (1920)

Director: John Francis Dillon

Cast: Mary Pickford, Albert Austin, Harold Goodwin, Rose Dione, Darwin Karr, Lavendor the Horse, Taylor N Duncan, Joan Marsh, Nadyne Montgomery, Theodore Roberts, Hal Wilson

75 min

Suds 1

Suds 6

 

 

Suds is a 1920 American silent comedy film directed by John Francis Dillon and starring Mary Pickford. The film is based on the 1904 English stage play ‘Op o’ Me Thumb, a one-act work first produced in London and presented the following year in New York with Maude Adams, a curtain raiser for her appearance in Peter Pan.[2]

Suds 4

Plot

Amanda Afflick (Mary Pickford) is a poor laundry woman working in London. She is too weak to do the hard work, but is always picked on and humiliated by her boss Madame Didier (Rose Dione). Amanda is desperately in love with the handsome customer Horace Greensmith (Albert Austin), but none of her colleague think she stands a chance of being his sweetheart.

One afternoon Amanda gets in trouble again and is forced to work all night long. All alone, she fantasizes about her first and only meeting with Horace, eight months ago. All the fellow employees ridicule her for still having faith that he will return someday to pick up his clothes. Amanda is fed up with all her colleagues making fun of her and lies that she is a duchess, coming from a wealthy family. She comes up with a story of her having an affair with Horace. Her father found out and sent her to live in London.

Meanwhile, co-worker Benjamin Jones (Harold Goodwin) has the job of collecting laundry with his cart. One day, his beloved horse Lavender is too weak to go up a hill and falls. The cart is destroyed and when Benjamin admits the truth to Madame Didier, she asks for the horse to be killed. Benjamin reveals to Amanda what will happen with Lavender and she tries to stop the horse from being killed. She eventually buys the horse and takes it into her own home.

Amanda is not allowed to take the horse into her own apartment and is noticed on the streets by the wealthy and sympathizing Lady Burke-Cavendish. She offers to take the horse to live at her country place. Amanda is delighted and accepts her offer. Later, Lady Burke-Cavendish stops by to tell Amanda the horse is doing very well. Amanda lies to the fellow laundry women Lady Burke-Cavendish is actually her aunt.

They are interrupted by Horace: he has returned for his laundry. The fellow workers assume he will recognize Amanda, since they were lied to he is her secret lover. Amanda is desperate and successfully pretends to be reunited with him. Horace is confused and wants to leave. While the laundry women are away she tells the truth to Horace. Benjamin walks in on them, initially trying to flirt with Amanda , but when he notices Horace’s presence he leaves.

Horace sympathizes with Amanda and invites her to his mansion. He changes his mind when he becomes ashamed of her. Amanda notices this and pulls back. Horace leaves and Amanda is left behind with a broken heart. She is later hired as Lady Burke-Cavendish’s personal maid and now lives in wealth. She finds out Horace is a worker at the country place and they fall in love with each other.

Suds 3

Remake

The original film was adapted to a musical written by Deonn Ritchie Hunt with music by Kim Douglas in the 2000s.

Cast

  • Mary Pickford as Amanda Afflick
  • Albert Austin as Horace Greensmith
  • Harold Goodwin as Benjamin Pillsbury Jones
  • Rose Dione as Madame Jeanne Gallifilet Didier
  • Darwin Karr as The Archduke
  • Taylor N. Duncan (undetermined role) (uncredited)
  • Joan Marsh (undetermined role) (uncredited)
  • Nadyne Montgomery (undetermined role) (uncredited)
  • Theodore Roberts (undetermined role) (uncredited)
  • Hal Wilson (undetermined role) (uncredited)

Suds 5

Production crew

  • Produced by Mary Pickford
  • Cinematography by L. William O’Connell and Charles Rosher
  • Art Direction by Max Parker
  • Costume Design by Adele Crinley
  • Assistant Director William A. Crinley
  • Art Department – Alfred L. Werker (props)
  • Other crew – William S. Johnson (electrical effects)

See also

References

Taming of the Shrew, The (1929)


Mary Pickford 1Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

Taming of the Shrew, The (1929)

Director: Sam Taylor

Cast: Mary Pickford, Douglas Fairbanks, Edwin Maxwell, Joseph Cawthorn, Clyde Cook, Geoffrey Wardwell, Dorothy Jordan, Frankie Genardi, Charles Stevens

63 min

Taming of the Shrew 1929 2

Taming of the Shrew 1929 3

 

 

 

 

The Taming of the Shrew (1929) is the first sound film adaptation of the Shakespearean play of the same name. The movie was directed by Sam Taylor, adapted by Taylor from William Shakespeare‘s play, and stars Mary Pickford and her husband Douglas Fairbanks.

Douglas Fairbanks 1929 - The Taming of the Shrew

Cast

Taming of the Shrew 1929 21

Production

The first sound version of the play on film, this version was planned as a sound film from the start. Pickford had already made her sound film debut in Coquette (1929) so The Taming of the Shrew marked her second talkie. [1] This version of the film is primarily known for how Pickford delivers Katherina’s last speech. As she moves though the litany of reasons why a woman should obey her husband, she winks toward Bianca, unseen by Petruchio. Bianca smiles in silent communication with Katherina, thus acknowledging that Katherina has not been tamed at all. Pickford and Fairbanks’ marriage was breaking down even before filming began, and animosity between the couple increased during filming. In later years, Pickford stated that working on the film was the worst experience of her life, although she also acknowledged that Fairbanks’ performance was one of his best.

Taming of the Shrew 1929 19

Reception

Fairbanks biographer Jeffrey Vance, writing in 2008, believes “Taming of the Shrew has never received the recognition it deserves as the first talking film of a Shakespeare play. It was not only technically superior to the majority of talking pictures in 1929 but would unquestionably be the finest translation onto film of Shakespeare for some time to come.” Vance also sees the film as a window into the Pickford-Fairbanks marriage: “As a reenactment of the Pickford-Fairbanks marriage, Taming of the Shrew continues to fascinate as a rather grim comedy. The two willful, larger-than-life personalities working at cross-purposes and conveying their resentment and frustration to each other through blatant one-upmanship and harsh wounds is both the movie and the marital union.” [2]

Taming of the Shrew 1929 10

Home media

After many years out of circulation, the film was re-released in 1966 in a new cut supervised by Pickford herself. New sound effects and music were added throughout, much of the voice dubbing was enhanced with newly available technology, and seven minutes were cut from the initial print. This re-released version is the only version now available on DVD or VHS.[3]

Taming of the Shrew 1929 17

References

  1. Jump up^ John C. Tibbetts; James M. Welsh. Douglas Fairbanks and the American Century. Books.google.com. p. 225. Retrieved 2016-11-02.
  2. Jump up^ Vance, Jeffrey. Douglas Fairbanks (Berkeley, 2008), 280.ISBN 978-0-520-25667-5.
  3. Jump up^ Aikman Archive DVD booklet

Taming of the Shrew 1929 4

M’Liss (1918)


Mary Pickford 1

Mary Pickford Season: FD Cinematheque

M’Liss (1918)

Director: Marshall Neilan

Cast: Mary Pickford, Theodore Roberts, Thomas Meighan, Tully Marshall, Charles Ogle, Monte Blue, Winifred Greenwood, Helen Kelly, Val Paul, William H Brown, John Burton, Charles A Post, Guy Oliver, Steve Murphy, Harry L Rattenberry, Charles Stevens

73 min

M'Liss 1918 1

M'Liss 1918 2

 

M’Liss is a 1918 American silent film directed by Marshall Neilan, written by Frances Marion and based on a Bret Harte story. The film was made previously in 1915 and was remade again in 1922 as The Girl Who Ran Wild, starring Gladys Walton. Another same-titled remake was released in 1936, starring Anne Shirley.

M'Liss 1918 7

Plot

The film takes place in the mining town of Red Gulch in the High Sierra. M’Liss (Mary Pickford) is one of the inhabitants whose father “Bummer” (Theodore Roberts) lost his fortune in the gold mines. Now his only investment, which pays a dividend, is his chicken Hildegarde. M’Liss regards herself as a crook and robs Yuba Bill’s stage coach. Yuba, however, is fascinated by the young lady and does not mind.

M’Liss is the only person in Bummer’s life, since his brother Jonathan, a wealthy pioneer, lives in San Francisco. One day, Jonathan turns his face toward the Sunset Trail. Clara Peterson (Winifred Goodwin) has been his nurse for over three years and her brother Jim (Val Paul) finds out they will receive $500 each for their services after his death. He is outraged they will get only that small amount of money.

Charles Gray (Thomas Meighan) is the school teacher who wants M’Liss to go to school as well. M’Liss isn’t interested in an education. Charles keeps on pursuing her and she finally decides to go. He demands her to mind her manners when she’s at school. She talks back to the boards members and is expelled. Charles, however, is charmed by the brave young girl. That same day, Bummer gets stabbed in the back by an unknown person. The sheriff suspects Charles, since he was the last person to visit Bummer.

When M’Liss is informed, she is crushed. She is invited to visit the murderer in jail and is shocked to find out it’s Charles. Three weeks later, a murder trial starts. M’Liss is the only one believing in Charles’ innocence. His wife Clara reaches town to visit him, only to find out he died. M’Liss refuses to believe she is her mother. Finally, Charles is sent to jail for 60 years. M’Liss helps him escape, but the police follow him. M’Liss witnesses them shooting Charles, but does not know they went after the wrong guy and actually shot Jim. Jim and Mexican Joe, the help of the sheriff, admit they killed Bummer for his will. The fortune is now send to M’Liss and a hidden Charles is set free and reunites with M’Liss.

M'Liss 1918 6

Cast

Reception

Like many American films of the time, M’Liss was subject to cuts by city and state film censorship boards. For example, the Chicago Board of Censors required cuts, in Reel 5, of the intertitle “Say, sheriff, how about a little necktie party” and the scene of the sheriff looking up tree and dropping rope.[3]

References

  1. Jump up^ The New York Times Review Remakes
  2. Jump up^ Progressive Silent Film List: M’Liss at silentera.com
  3. Jump up^ “Official Cut-Outs by the Chicago Board of Censors”. Exhibitors Herald. New York City: Exhibitors Herald Company. 6 (21): 31. May 18, 1918.

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